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Medical abstract:

Prefrontal cortex oxygenation during incremental exercise in chronic fatigue syndrome

Sunday 3 August 2008

ME/CFS Society (SA) IncThe following medical abstract was posted on Co-Cure’s List Archives for August 2008:

 


Date:         Sat, 2 Aug 2008 16:51:51 -0400
Reply-To:     ME/CFS and Fibromyalgia Information Exchange Forum
              <[log in to unmask]>
Sender:       ME/CFS and Fibromyalgia Information Exchange Forum
              <[log in to unmask]>
From:         Fred Springfield <[log in to unmask]>
Subject:      RES: Prefrontal cortex oxygenation during
              incremental exercise in chronic fatigue syndrome
Content-type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1; format=flowed

Prefrontal cortex oxygenation during incremental exercise in
chronic fatigue syndrome.

Journal: Clin Physiol Funct Imaging. 2008 Jul 29.
[Epub ahead of print]

Authors: J. Patrick Neary [1], Andy D. W. Roberts [2], Nina Leavins [2], Michael F. Harrison [1], James C. Croll [2] and James R. Sexsmith [2]

Affiliations:
[1] Faculty of Kinesiology & Health Studies, University of Regina, Regina, SK, Canada and
[2] Faculty of Kinesiology, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton NB, Canada

Correspondence to J. Patrick Neary, PhD, Faculty of Kinesiology & Health Studies, University of Regina, Regina, SK, Canada S4S 0A2 E-mail: <[log in to unmask]>

Affiliation: Faculty of Kinesiology & Health Studies, University of Regina, Regina, SK, Canada.

NLM Citation: PMID: 18671793

This study examined the effects of maximal incremental exercise on cerebral oxygenation in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) subjects. Furthermore, we tested the hypothesis that CFS subjects have a reduced oxygen delivery to the brain during exercise.

Six female CFS and eight control (CON) subjects (similar in height, weight, body mass index and physical activity level) performed an incremental cycle ergometer test to exhaustion, while changes in cerebral oxy-haemoglobin (HbO(2)), deoxy-haemoglobin (HHb), total blood volume (tHb = HbO(2) + HHb) and O(2) saturation [tissue oxygenation index (TOI), %)] was monitored in the left prefrontal lobe using a near-infrared spectrophotometer. Heart rate (HR) and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) were recorded at each workload throughout the test.

Predicted VO(2peak) in CFS (1331 +/- 377 ml) subjects was significantly (P </= 0.05) lower than the CON group (1990 +/- 332 ml), and CFS subjects achieved volitional exhaustion significantly faster (CFS: 351 +/- 224 s; CON: 715 +/- 176 s) at a lower power output (CFS: 100 +/- 39 W; CON: 163 +/- 34 W). CFS subjects also exhibited a significantly lower maximum HR (CFS: 154 +/- 13 bpm; CON: 186 +/- 11 bpm) and consistently reported a higher RPE at the same absolute workload when compared with CON subjects. Prefrontal cortex HbO(2), HHb and tHb were significantly lower at maximal exercise in CFS versus CON, as was TOI during exercise and recovery. The CFS subjects exhibited significant exercise intolerance and reduced prefrontal oxygenation and tHb response when compared with CON subjects.

These data suggest that the altered cerebral oxygenation and blood volume may contribute to the reduced exercise load in CFS, and supports the contention that CFS, in part, is mediated centrally.

KEYWORDS
central fatigue • cerebral oxygenation • chronic fatigue syndrome • exercise • near-infrared spectroscopy

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