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ME/CFS SOUTH AUSTRALIA INC

Registered Charity 3104

Email:
sacfs@sacfs.asn.au

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PO Box 322,
Modbury North,
South Australia 5092

Phone:
1300 128 339

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ME/CFS South Australia Inc supports the needs of sufferers of Myalgic Encephalomyelitis, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and related illnesses. We do this by providing services and information to members.

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New Understanding Of Chronic Fatigue Can Pave Way To Better Treatment

Thursday 4 August 2016

 

From the Epoch Times:

 

Epoch Times
 

New Understanding of Chronic Fatigue Can Pave Way to Better Treatment

By Epoch Times
August 1, 2016
Copyright © 2000-2016

Imagine feeling dead tired—drained of every drop of energy. On top of this, you feel as if you’ve come down with an infection. Your throat is sore, your body aches, and your memory and ability to concentrate are shot.

For the 1 million to 2.5 million Americans who suffer with chronic fatigue syndrome, this is daily life. People with this condition find exercise nearly impossible, even a minor stress can be devastating, and they may sleep for more than 12 hours a night yet still never overcome the overwhelming sense of exhaustion.

Chronic fatigue syndrome is a complex condition that has gained a number of names over the years—Epstein-Barr Syndrome, Chronic Mononucleosis Syndrome, and Myalgic Encephalopathy just to name a few. In the 1980s it was dubbed “yuppie flu” because it seemed to favor type A professionals who worked too hard for too long and burned themselves out.

The problem with most names for this condition is that they often don’t include everybody who suffers with it. The latest term—Systemic Exertion Intolerance Disease (SEID)—strives to be more accurate and inclusive.

 

Full article…

 


 

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