Society Logo
ME/CFS Australia Ltd
Please click here to donate ME/CFS Australia (SA) Inc
 
 
Facebook
 
ME/CFS AUSTRALIA (SA) INC

Registered Charity 3104

Email:
sacfs@sacfs.asn.au

Mailing address:
PO Box 322,
Modbury North,
South Australia 5092

Office:
Suite 506,
North Terrace House,
19 North Terrace,
Hackney, SA, 5069


Phone:
1300 128 339

Office Hours:
Wednesdays, 11am-3pm

ME/CFS Australia (SA) Inc supports the needs of sufferers of Myalgic Encephalomyelitis, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and related illnesses. We do this by providing services and information to members.

Disclaimer

ME/CFS Australia (SA) Inc aims to keep members informed of various research projects, diets, medications, therapies, news items, etc. All communication, both verbal and written, is merely to disseminate information and not to make recommendations or directives.

Unless otherwise stated, the views expressed on this Web site are not necessarily the official views of the Society or its Committee and are not simply an endorsement of products or services.

Become a Member
PDF Application Form (PDF, 242KB)
Why become a member?

A Psychosomatic Diagnosis Is A Doctor's Way Of Saying, "I Don't Have A Clue"

Friday 20 January 2017

 

From Quartz:

 

Doctor
"The honest truth? I have no idea."
(Photo: Reuters/Carlos Barria)
 

A psychosomatic diagnosis is a doctor’s way of saying, “I don’t have a clue”

By Jamison Hill
January 13, 2017

For the last six years, I have fought to legitimize an illness widely—and erroneously—believed to be “all in your head.”

I have myalgic encephalomyelitis, a debilitating multi-system disease that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention conservatively estimates afflicts more than one million Americans. It is commonly known as chronic fatigue syndrome, a truly trivializing name that belittles what I and other sufferers live with. (Though it is preferable to the condescending term “yuppie flu.”) Doctors have told many people with the disease—including myself—that there is no treatment, and more often, that what we are experiencing is merely a manifestation of the mind.

The latter is the basis for psychosomatic theory, which is the idea that the mind can produce diseases. Diseases commonly thought to be psychosomatic—such as irritable bowel syndrome and Crohn’s disease—can pummel a healthy, thriving member of society without any indication of how. This theory became popular in the US in the early 20th century; Sigmund Freud is the most well-known name associated with it, who maintained that “hysteria” could cause any number of physical illnesses.

 

Full article…

 


 

blog comments powered by Disqus
Previous Previous Page