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ME/CFS AUSTRALIA (SA) INC

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NIH Study Aims To Unravel The Illness Known As 'Chronic Fatigue Syndrome'

Wednesday 3 May 2017

 

From NPR:

 

Brian Vastag
Brian Vastag suffers from myalgic encephalomyelitis/
chronic fatigue syndrome, or ME/CFS for short.
He is part of an NIH study of the disease, which is
commonly called chronic fatigue syndrome.
(Photo: Miriam Tucker for NPR.)
 

NIH Study Aims To Unravel The Illness Known As 'Chronic Fatigue Syndrome'

By Miriam E. Tucker
May 1, 2017

In July 2012, a science reporter for The Washington Post, Brian Vastag, was in Wisconsin visiting his family when a high fever hit. He became instantly bedridden with flu-like symptoms that never went away.

"It didn't feel like anything I'd ever had before. ... The things that distinguished it were the dizziness and the feeling of unreality in the head," Vastag says.

Now, nearly five years later, the 45-year-old can no longer concentrate or read even a few sentences without becoming exhausted. A short walk to the mailbox means lying down for the rest of the day. In September, he'll qualify for Medicare due to his disability.

That level of severity isn't the picture most people — including physicians — think of when they hear the term "chronic fatigue syndrome." But that was the diagnosis Vastag finally received after 18 months of visiting numerous doctors, submitting countless vials of blood and initially being misdiagnosed with West Nile virus.

Actually, Vastag's condition is now termed "myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome," or ME/CFS for short, and is estimated to affect at least 1 million people in the U.S. alone. Many with the condition dislike the name "chronic fatigue syndrome" because they feel it's trivializing and misleading, giving the impression that they're simply tired or depressed when in fact many are quite ill.

 

Full article…

 


 

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