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ME/CFS AUSTRALIA (SA) INC

Registered Charity 3104

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Why Did It Take The CDC So Long To Reverse Course On Debunked Treatments For Chronic Fatigue Syndrome?

Wednesday 27 September 2017

 

From STAT:

 

Treadmill
After years of resisting pleas from patients, advocates, and
clinicians, the CDC quietly dropped its recommendations
for debunked treatments for chronic fatigue syndrome,
which included graded exercise and psychotherapy.
(Photo: APSTOCK)
 

Why did it take the CDC so long to reverse course on debunked treatments for chronic fatigue syndrome?

By Julie Rehmeyer and David Tuller
September 25, 2017
© 2017 STAT

For years, people with chronic fatigue syndrome have wrangled with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention over information on the agency’s website about this debilitating illness. The website highlighted two treatments that became the de facto standards of care: a gradual increase in exercise and a form of psychotherapy known as cognitive behavioral therapy. The problem was that the evidence doesn’t support these treatments.

This summer, after years of resisting pleas from patients, advocates, and clinicians, the CDC quietly dropped the treatment recommendations from its website. Its decision represents a major victory for the patient community — and for science. But the country’s lead public health agency still has a long way to go to meet its responsibilities to the estimated 1 million Americans with this disease.

 

Full article…

 


 

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