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ME/CFS SOUTH AUSTRALIA INC

Registered Charity 3104

Email:
sacfs@sacfs.asn.au

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ME/CFS South Australia Inc supports the needs of sufferers of Myalgic Encephalomyelitis, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and related illnesses. We do this by providing services and information to members.

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The Trials Of Travelling With A Disability - And How It Can Be Improved

Monday 15 July 2019

 

From UK newspaper The Telegraph:

 

Travels
'It's hard, with nothing obvious to indicate to
those around you that you are struggling.'
(Credit: Getty)
 

The trials of travelling with a disability - and how it can be improved

By Telegraph Travel
14 July 2019
© Telegraph Media Group Limited 2019.

As part of our Safer, Fairer, Better campaign, five travellers tell us about the accessibility challenges they face on the road.

...

Priority seating is a flawed system

Hannah Turner

I’m 31 and have chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS; also known as ME). With a range of debilitating symptoms including widespread pain, muscle weakness, extreme fatigue and cognitive impairment, CFS is best described as feeling like you permanently have mild flu.

But despite the fact that at least 250,000 people in the UK currently suffer with CFS, awareness and understanding remains quite low.

One of the many challenges of living with this condition is that it is an invisible illness, with nothing obvious to indicate to those around you that you are struggling. This can make accessing help challenging and nowhere is this more true then when you are travelling.

Sometimes – on public transport, for example – there is a priority seats scheme, designed to assist the elderly, disabled and pregnant woman in getting a seat. But it is a flawed system and not well enough enforced.

 

Full article…

 


 

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