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ME/CFS SOUTH AUSTRALIA INC

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USC Research To Diagnose 'Invisible' Illness Faster

Wednesday 11 December 2019

 

From the University of the Sunshine Coast (USC):

 

Dr Zack Shan
Dr Zack Shan
 

USC research to diagnose ‘invisible’ illness faster

9 December 2019
© 2019 University of the Sunshine Coast.

A USC researcher has been awarded a prestigious National Health and Medical Research Council grant worth more than $1.2million to help find the underlying neurobiological factors that cause chronic fatigue syndrome and help diagnose it faster.

Also known as myalgic encephalomyelitis, the debilitating illness is often described as an ‘invisible’ health condition and affects between 94,000 and 242,000 Australians.

Symptoms include extreme exhaustion, headaches, and sore or aching muscles. There is currently no single test to diagnose the illness or any approved treatment or cure.

The five-year research grant will support Dr Zack Shan, a Senior Research Fellow from USC’s Thompson Institute, further explore his recent hypothesis that abnormal neurovascular coupling may be the underpinning cause of chronic fatigue syndrome.

 

Full article…

 


 

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